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Obama, Romney engage in testy moments during town hall

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TWC News: Obama, Romney engage in testy moments during town hall
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President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney faced off for their second presidential debate Tuesday evening.

The stakes were high for President Obama, and right from the start, he went on the attack.

“Gov. Romney doesn't have a five-point plan,” the president said. “He has a one-point plan. And that is to make sure that folks at the top play by a different set of rules.


President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney faced off for their second presidential debate Tuesday evening.

The stakes were high for President Obama, and right from the start, he went into attack mode.

“Gov. Romney doesn't have a five-point plan,” the president said. “He has a one-point plan, and that is to make sure that folks at the top play by a different set of rules."

President Obama seemed determined to try and erase the effects of his lackluster turn in the first presidential debate. He was criticized then for holding back, and for failing to bring up sensitive issues like Romney's widely publicized remarks disparaging 47 percent of Americans.

“When he said behind closed doors that 47 percent of the country considered themselves victims who refused personal responsibility,” Obama said. “Think about who he was talking about.

However, the GOP candidate said he cares about all Americans.

“I care about 100 percent of the American people,” Gov. Romney said. “I want 100 percent of the American people to have a bright and prosperous future."

The level of engagement during the debate was particularly intense, in part because the candidates could move freely around the stage.

Romney hammered the president on the national deficit, using it to punch back at Obama when he attacked Romney's budget and tax plans. The president says his opponent's proposals do not add up.

"When we are talking about math that doesn't add up, how about $4 trillion in deficits over the last four years, $5 trillion,” Romney said. “That's math that doesn't add up."

The president grew testy during an exchange about the U.S. response to the attacks in Libya that killed an American ambassador. He said the suggestion that anyone on his team was trying to score political points or mislead the country about the attacks was offensive.

“That is not what we do,” the president said. “That is not what I do as president. That is not what I do as commander-in-chief.”

The candidates have one final debate. It will be held next Monday and focus on foreign policy.

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