Monday, July 28, 2014

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LET'S EAT

On Tuesdays and Fridays, TWC News discovers and reveals the flavor and chic scene of some of your favorite restaurants around Central Texas in Let's Eat. It’s a weekly glimpse at Austin’s culinary side with local chefs, pastry artists, sommeliers and others taking viewers in their eateries and kitchens and cooking up some of their favorite signature dishes and other food and drink preparations.




07/22/2014 08:20 AM Posted By: TWC News Staff
TWC News: Dock and Roll Diner
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Lee Krassner is the chef and one of the owners of Dock and Roll Diner, which has been serving up lobster rolls in Austin since 2011.

Krassner says he went to culinary school in New York around the time the lobster roll phenomenon was happening. "It really made an imprint on me," he said.

Dock and Roll Diner uses only claw and knuckle meat for its lobster rolls. The seafood is flown in fresh from the Northeast once or twice each week.

"We were up in Maine about a month ago and we met some really great lobster people up there, so they ship us down meat," Krassner said.

Dock and Roll Diner's lobster rolls are so popular that the restaurant was invited to New York City to participate in the Lobster Rumble competition.

"It's basically the best lobster roll restaurants in the country get invited up there," Krassner said. "We were the only one from Texas and that really meant a lot to us."

To find out more, check out the "Let's Eat" video above.


07/15/2014 10:39 AM Posted By: TWC News Staff
TWC News: Culinary Institute of America go 'Beyond Cooking'
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Do you have what it takes to be the next master chef?

The kitchens of the Culinary Institute of America help teach future chefs how a restaurant business works. Associate professor Hinnerk von Bargen says that means teaching students about more than just cooking.

"Cooking is a very important aspect, of course — the preparation of food — but what we strive to do is, we strive for our students to understand food," von Bargen said.

In addition to learning about food, students in the program also learn about management and purchasing so they can best maximize their dollar.

"At the end of the day, we all have a bottom line, so we teach these things. We teach culinary maths," von Bargen said. "An overall understanding of food and its management."

To hear more about what students are learning in the program, check out the "Let's Eat" segment above.


07/08/2014 08:45 AM Posted By: TWC News Staff
TWC News: Spirit of Texas Distillery
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The Lone Star State is quickly becoming known for it's craft vodka and whisky, and now the Spirit of Texas distillery is adding rum to the mix.

Spirit of Texas President and Head Distiller Shaun Siems said he and a few coworkers initially began thinking about opening a brewery.

"We just looked at how much other competition there was out there, so we decided to come out with something different," he said.

To make their rum uniquely Texan, Spirit of Texas distillers actually add pecans to the barrels while the rum ages.

"I showed up one day, and he says, 'Here, try this,'" Spirit of Texas Distiller Michael Rajski said. "I took a sip of it, and I said, 'This is good whiskey. This tastes pretty good.' And he's like, 'No, that's our pecan rum.'"

Hear more about the Spirit of Texas, its Texas rum and how the distillery was built from the ground up in the "Let's Eat" segment above.


07/01/2014 09:31 AM Posted By: TWC News Staff
TWC News: Argus Cidery Packs a Delicate Punch
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The artisans at Argus Cidery in the Hill Country are brewing up all kinds of hard cider — but not like the kind you'd find on a grocery store shelf.

For example, cider doesn’t always have to be made with apples. Argus Cidery recently launched its Tempache Especial, which is a sparkling pineapple wine.

Wes Mickel with Argus Cidery says anything with an alcohol content below 7 percent is considered a cider, and anything above 7 percent is considered wine.

Other than that, the art of making refreshing cider is wide open.

“There are not a whole lot of rules,” Mickel said. “We are able to try many, many different forms and fashions of what we comprehend cider to be.”

Mickel says what makes Texas special is its apples, and that's why Argus Cidery receives from theirs from the Hill Country and Lubbock areas. Find out more in this “Let’s Eat” in the video above.


06/17/2014 08:44 AM Posted By: TWC News Staff
TWC News: Arcade Midtown Kitchen
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Jesse Perez is the owner and executive chef of Arcade Midtown Kitchen, a San Antonio favorite that features Americana cuisine.

"Being a chef here, it's about having the ability to kind of do artwork that you normally can't do if you don't have the artistic side of painting or sculpting or whatever," Perez said. "We are kind of doing that with the food on the plate."

Perez said the kitchen was designed for approachability. He wanted an open format, so people could see what's going on it the kitchen, sort of like an arcade.

"The food culture has completely changed," Perez said. "Now, we're offering restaurants that are a lot more geared toward the chef-driven possibilities."

Hear more from Perez in the "Let's Eat" segment above.


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