Tuesday, July 29, 2014

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Your Driver's Ed

Every Wednesday and Sunday, TWC News' Ed Keiner helps drivers get to know their vehicle better by providing tips on how to understand and correct your car’s mechanical problems--from changing your flat tire to jumping your car’s battery, Keiner proves to be Your Driver’s Ed.

07/27/2014 11:01 AM Posted By: Ed Keiner
TWC News: electric cars
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Electric cars, which run on an electric motor powered by a battery, are becoming more and more popular.

One electric car, the Chevy Volt, will take drivers about 40 miles without using a single drop of gas. There are multiple ways to charge the car — either with a Level 1 charger that plugs into a regular outlet or a Level 2 charger, which charges much faster than a Level 1.

The Chevy Volt also has a gas motor that powers an electric generator that will charge the battery while the car's being driven.

To find out more about the Chevy Volt and features of electric cars, check out the "Driver's Ed" segment above.


07/23/2014 07:56 AM Posted By: Ed Keiner
TWC News: Drivers Ed
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Electrical circuits have always been a major part of your car, and to protect those circuits, automakers use fuses.

A fuse is a device designed to fail before any damage can be done to that circuit. Early on, automakers used glass tube-type fuses, but they were difficult to remove and broke easily, so automakers stopped making them in 1981.

Blade fuses and fusible links are more common these days. Find out more about fuses in the "Driver's Ed" segment above.


07/20/2014 11:18 AM Posted By: Ed Keiner
TWC News: Tips and Tricks for Splicing Wires
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Adding after-market parts — like fog lights, a new stereo or speakers — is a great way to personalize your car, but that involves wiring.

In order to add any sort of after-market electronics, it's important you know how to properly splice wires. A soldering iron is one of the best ways to join wires together, but it's not very practical under the dash.

In the "Driver's Ed" segment above, our Ed Keiner has some great tips and advice on other ways to splice to wires together.


07/13/2014 03:05 PM Posted By: Ed Keiner
TWC News: The Power of the Sun: Technology Behind Solar-Powered Cars
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On July 21, nearly 25 teams from around the world are going to compete in a cross-country race that goes from Texas all the way to Minnesota — using solar cars.

Each solar car in the competition is designed by students at the university that's going to be racing it. Students at the University of Texas have built their own solar car to enter into the competition.

Learn more about UT's car, the competition and the technologies used in the "Driver's Ed" segment above.


07/06/2014 11:56 AM Posted By: Ed Keiner
TWC News: Driver's Ed
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A shock is part of your car's suspension that works with the springs.

Without the shock, your vehicle would bounce continuously on its springs. When the shock is working properly, it controls the spring and gives you a smooth ride.

Shocks generally need to be replaced about every 50,000 miles. There are also other signs, like dents in the pistons and leaking fluid, that indicate that your shocks need to be replaced.

Watch the "Driver's Ed" segment above for more information.


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