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SCIENCE BREAK

Take a Science Break with TWC News Chief Meteorologist Burton Fitzsimmons as he connects you, and the minds of area youth, to the world of science every Tuesday.

11/18/2014 08:24 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: Motion After Effect
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Motion aftereffect is what happens when you focus on a stationary object after experiencing visual stimuli.

The effect can be demonstrated simply by using a top with a swirl on it and your palm. Spin the top, stare at it for some time and then look at any stationary object, like your palm.

Check out the visual science and get a full explanation from our Burton Fitzsimmons in this edition of "Science Break."


11/11/2014 12:39 PM Posted By: TWC News Staff
TWC News: What does Salt do to Ice?
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Today on “Science Break,” we've got an easy experiment with sodium chloride, more commonly known as table salt.

If you take a block of ice, drape a thread on it and add ice, a funny thing happens. It’s a good lesson on why salt is used as a de-icing agent.

Our Burton Fitzsimmons gives the experiment a try in the video above.


10/28/2014 07:16 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: Atomic Worm Goo
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It's not quite Oct. 31 yet, so we've got a little bit more Halloween fun to showcase in this "Science Break."

Using polymers, which are basically molecules that can bond like a chain under the right conditions, and atomic worm goo, we're making glow worms.

Once activated, atomic worm goo will stay solidly wormy and even glow in the dark. Check it out in the video above.


10/07/2014 09:48 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: Science Break
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Today on "Science Break," we're taking a dry ice experiment to a whole new level just for Halloween.

Using warm water, dry ice and food coloring, you can create a pretty cool Halloween visual. Add in some glow sticks, turn out the lights and you get an even spookier Halloween ambiance.

For the full demonstration and instructions on how you can try out this experiment, watch the video above.


09/27/2014 10:57 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: Balloons and Buoyancy
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Helium is lighter than nitrogen — the element that mostly makes up the air we breathe — which is why helium-filled balloons float and balloons that are filled up with air from your lungs sink.

However, the right combination of air from your lungs and helium will cause a balloon to become neutrally buoyant, meaning it'll suspend itself wherever it's released.

What ratio of human air to helium do you think would make the balloon neutrally buoyant? Check out the "Science Break" video above for the answer.


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