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SCIENCE BREAK

Take a Science Break with TWC News Chief Meteorologist Burton Fitzsimmons as he connects you, and the minds of area youth, to the world of science every Tuesday.

12/16/2014 09:48 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: Physics
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Energy isn't created out of thin air, which can be proven with a simple physics experiment.

Using a tennis ball that's tied overhead, choose a starting point and release the ball so it swings like a pendulum. You'll notice the ball never quite reaches where it initially started and will continue to slow down as it loses more energy.

Check out the "Science Break" video above for more.


12/09/2014 11:45 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: Creating an Infinite Loop with the Möbius Strip
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Would you believe it's possible to take a two-sided piece of paper and make it into a one-sided item?

With a little bit of a twist — literally — we can create a Mobius strip, a sort of infinite loop molded together by a single boundary.

Check it out in the "Science Break" video above.


12/02/2014 07:12 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: The Benham's Disk: A Mystifying Optical Illusion
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The Benham's disk is an optical illusion that's mystified scientists since a toymaker invented it in 1894.

The top is black and white, but when set in motion, everything changes and it becomes colorful.

Scientists don't completely understand the science behind it, though they believe it has something to do with the cones in our eyes.

Check it out in the "Science Break" segment above.


11/25/2014 10:40 AM Posted By: TWC News Staff
TWC News: Making Noise with Paper
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You’ve seen noise makers that imitate a duck or bird, but you can get a similar effect with just a piece of paper.

Things get a little noisy in this edition of “Science Break” when Meteorologist Burton Fitzsimmons shows us how to fold a piece of paper into a noise maker.

See how in the video above.


11/18/2014 08:24 AM Posted By: Burton Fitzsimmons
TWC News: Motion After Effect
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Motion aftereffect is what happens when you focus on a stationary object after experiencing visual stimuli.

The effect can be demonstrated simply by using a top with a swirl on it and your palm. Spin the top, stare at it for some time and then look at any stationary object, like your palm.

Check out the visual science and get a full explanation from our Burton Fitzsimmons in this edition of "Science Break."


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